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6分娱乐2020年05月22日16时06分27秒

时间:2020-05-28 22:59:34 作者:千千音乐 浏览量:28861

复制网址领彩金【ag88.shop】2FS4 c4z6FNEJ】9;Em【otion【s run】nin/g high&#/039; in Brexit blame g\a\merns3

NlHwT/ext siz【eAaAaTakin【g you on a jou【rne】y ac\ross t/he Yorksh/ire Dales an【d all【/ the way\ to Vanco【uver Is【land, Kate Fletcher&/【rsquo;s "Wild Dress" is an autob】iographica】l me】ander through the tende/r mom【ents wher/e clothing ha\s made her f/e【el 【embedde】d in nature. A Professor o【f su】stainability, design and【 fashi】on at the U\niversity of the Arts Lond/】o\/n; Fletch【er【 h\as】 been /a】t t】\he forefront of 【the\ c】/all for s\/ystematic change in /the fas【hion /industr【y.\ In her 【first col】lection of person【al writin】gs, \】Fletcher】 ha/s chosen t/o explore the complex and often art】ificially detached re】la/【t\ionship between the natur【al world a/nd/ what 【we\ wear.Fle/tcher looks at clothing as/ something m\ore e/ssential and far 【beyond its /si】mple【, modern, role as/ a dis】posabl【e commodity. It’s \no【t difficult to see that our c【ultural relationship with clothing has been【 】distorted by years of f/ast-movin【g/ \mo【de】rn /fashio】n t】rends but as she recou】nts the story of her【 【dad&rsquo/;s favourite jumper, there is a glimmer of some nostalgic, int】ergen/er【ational import\ance that breaks through/. Mending this dec【ade/】s-old piece of clothin/g using wool found 】in hedgerows and on fences she mus\es about this as a/ rebellious /act. “As I worked my lap felt w/arm,” she writes【, “Doing this felt like a way to live not】 j/u】st through the rules of 【modern society.&rdqu\o;Ch/arlie M\ee/chamIt’【s not just abo/ut rebell【ing \for the sake of reduci/ng w【ast/e, 】however. Fletcher rec】o【gnizes the】【 way t/hat modern out】do\or clothing i【mpos【es a kind of】 distance from the natural \world.【 The 】clothing we ch\/oose to wear becomes a divisio【n; 】farmworker vs lando【wner, recr\eatio/nal h/iker vs those \who work the land. A ne【ed for\ spe】/ci】fi【c, tec【h】no\log】ically advanced outdoor gear in b\right neon oil-based mat】erials 【is, Fletcher says, ju\st another in/dicat\ion of rampant cons\um\er \cult/ure.Th/e art installati【on teac】hing us to c【are for our/ forestsLivin/g Recomm【ends | A/ "vital tool】"\ for fighting the rising tide of si】ngle/ use plasticsL】\ivin【g Recommends 】| /No/ one is too s】mall to 【make a d【iffer】enceIt’s\ a v【ery d/\】i/fferent way to int【【roduce this/ message. Distan/t from the usual ev/ils of fast fa】sh/ion’s rapidly evolving aesthetics, she e】xp/lores the im\prac/tic/ali【ty of the always new in【 the/ face o/f the a\n】ci\ent /forces of the elements. Fletcher is【n’t preaching about all of the usual】 sust【ainab】le fa】/shion clichés but instead inviting you to think differently about how you\r/ garments can bring y】ou joy. T\he thrill o【f newness is fleeting 【but\ rich cultural relat\】】io】nships can and will【 last 【a lif//e\【time.Jack Gr\angeShunning the newness\ of n\/eoprene allows you to embrace /a\ more per/me\able【 exterior【. &/ldquo】;Once we\/&【rsquo;re there, we learn from the land and listen\ to the voic/es /of the b\irds and the \rain,” she writes, “We /give attentio】n to the unta【med parts of our【 world, in【】clud/ing that 【part in ourselves. [...] And this】 requires,】 at the least, that we make the \la】yers\ that【 \we build up 】ar【ound ourselves&【\mdash; some of wh】ich 】ar】e【 fashio【n in cloth—more permeable.&rdqu】o; Our clothing does\n&rsquo】;t alway】s have to /fo【rm】 a bar】】r【ier \between th】e inside and t】he outside, sometimes, whe】n your /&ldquo\;co】at&\rsquo;s wide sleeves grip\ onto\ t/h/\e lip o】f a gust&rdquo【】;】 o】r/ your &ldq】uo;trousers, wide-】legged act as a kite&rdq】u/o; it can \help you form \a connecti/on 】with na【tu/re.Kate Fletch/【er's Wi】ld Dress: Clothing a\nd the】 natural world is av\ailable from Uniformbooks, more \informatio】n can be fou\nd here.Share this articl/e M/ore 【from\ lifej0Bz

vagjA\ctivists【 are】 raising funds to save Danish wooden 】【boat】sTCIwsBRu

fqQKText si【zeAaAaThe common hippo】p【o/ta/mus is know\n for th\eir /rapacious appetites and spending a lot /of/ time/\/ in water, no wond】e【r, 'river hor【se is the literal En】glish translation o\f【 the Greek word Hipp【opotamus/. T\hey spend up to 16 ho/ur/s a day submerg】e【d in rive/rs and la】kes to keep their massive bodies cool under th/e hot African sun. And in t//he rest of /their】 time? They consume】\ bet/ween 25-40 kilos of grass.And with【 these two \act【ions, they already do a lo【t for th/ei【r env/iro【nmen/t. A recent study b\/y /University of Antwerp 】biolo】g\ist J\onas Schoelynck and his/ 】col/leagues, published in Scienc【e Ad/vances found hippo/' daily hab【its pl/ay a key role in maintainin/g】 e/co】syste【ms. Th\【e scientists fo】und out about their key r/ole【 by/\ /】analysing s/ample/s from the Mara R\iver, which runs throu【gh t】he Maasa/i Mar【a National Reserve, a savann\ah in Kenya.The mam//mal】s living in this park are protected, h【oweve】r\, ou/tsid/e o】f t】hese a/r\ea/s scient/ist\s sa/y h\ippo numbers/ are down. The IUCN Red \List describes the hippos as vulnerable and now scientists are war/ning 【tha】t t\h/e dw【indling number of hippos across A/fr\ica/ \is potentially harmful to the continent's /rivers and la/k】es.Clic/k on the video a/bove to see how hippo\s make th】e ecosystem run around them.Share this article More \/f】rom pl】acese44v

INP5Ic【eland's lar】gest national p\ark is h】oping to【 /gain UNESCO World\ Herit\age sta】tus at UN committe】e talks in】 Azerbaijan/.Vatnajökull Nati【onal Pa】rk is home to vast glaciers, utterly uni\nh【abit【ed land and ten ac\】tive v\olcanos. Despite the presence of o\p】posing elements/, the great land】scape h\as remained st【ab【l/e【 for/ more than 1,000 years. The meltin【g ice from the /glaciers f【uels some of Iceland'】s most powerful rivers. T】he seasonal ebb 】and flo\w of the ice 】i】s 【crit】ical in mainta/】】ining the/ sta】】bilit\y of the ecosystem of】 /Vatnaj&o】um】】l/;kull\, wh】ich covers 14% of Iceland.Now, however, r/ising temperatures are causing the gl【aciers to melt at unprec/e/d【ented rates. Every/ y\ear, more ice disappears,/ r/evea【ling 】new la\nd underneath the glaciers. In the/ last \century】 alone】, Vatnajök\ull has lost 10% of its volume.The a/re【a is so unlike /anyth】ing else /o\n earth that it has been used as a case study by as/tronauts. In the months pr\eceding the Apollo 11 mission in the late six\ties, Neil Armstrong and his c/olleagues visited the 】park to \study its l】un【ar】-like/ terrain. Som/e a】reas\ of Vatnajökull Nati\onal Park are utterly uninhabited by /lif】e, \be it animal o/r plan\t, render\ing it an ideal】 place to \stud\y moon-like geology.Water, fire /and ice, the elemen/ts that】 make up 【the uniqu\e park【 ar【e represen】ted on t/he nati\onal f\lag of /Ice\la】n【d, blue fo/r water, red for fire, and white】/ for ice. If granted /Wor\ld Heritage Sta【tu】s, Va\tnajöku】ll National Park】 \wil【l b【e the third】 Icelandic site to】 a\chieve the status.Want more【 news?】Video editor • Fr\ancois RazyShare this a【\/rtic】leCopy/pa\ste the 【ar【ticle video emb】ed /link【 bel【ow:CopyShareTweet【S//ha\resen\dShareTweet\SharesendMoreHid【eShar【eSendShareShareShareSe】ndShareShareYou m【ig/ht also l/ike 】 】 / \ 【 / 【 \ \Climate Change top of t\he agen\da as No【rdic mi【niste/rs m/ee】t /Germ/any's Merkel in Iceland 】 【 【 / 【 【【 \ 【\ \Tens of t】housands of Estonian】s perfo/rm mass folk singin【g 】 / \ 】【 Well-being agenda: d/oes this spell/ the e\nd for GDP? \ 】 More abou\t20-seconds【Icel\andEnvironmental protec/tionUNESCO Cultur】a/l 】Heritage ListEnviro/nment / 【 Browse today�【39;s ta】gsZ6Ri

X27sFamily-run fish/eries struggle /as \new generati\on casts net wider3E2w

Take/ a look at Prince Har\ry's re】ma/rkable message on Earth】 Day

rkJ9Gra/pe skin leather\ is one of the】/ alternativ/es. \MATS

RKDWT\ext sizeAaAaFr【【om food 【wast/e to/ woodchips, a wide sel【ec/tion of surprising 【raw material】s can end\ up s【erv/ing as an alternative to plastics. Th】ey can be biodegradable in/ just a few months or even c/ompostable as opposed】 to the synthe\tic plastics, which stays \with us fo\r sev【eral【【/ h】\undreds【 of years in 】the\ landfills and release\s a lo\ng list of toxic che【mi\cal【/s /into our env【iron\m/ent. Rec/ycling can help ease some of these proble/ms\, but th【e be】st solution seem\s to 【repla/ce t【hem with more eco-f】ri【endly m】aterials】.However, some bi】od/egradable plastic has already attracted critical rem\a【rks, such as the one made from hemp and/ co\rn starch 【a【mong ot/hers. There are debat/es that pro\ducin】g these can resu/lt in a】】n even /greater amount】 of pollutants】,【 due to the pro\d】uctio/n with fertilizer【s and pe【sticides as well as the chemical p/rocessing】 nee【ded to】 turn organic material int\o plastic./Living 【it m\ade a selection of【 some recent】\ innovation/】s, w/hich need no land 【and no pesti】cides t\o produce,/ 【as ma/inly usi【【ng what is given by nature.Fr【om seaw\eed to biod//egradable plasticLiv】ing it rep\orted 【earlier\ abo【ut researchers, who have devised a possible solution/ for dur\able plastic waste, 】i/nspired\ b\y the oce//an. Scienti【sts \at Tel Aviv Univ】ersity have created a biodegradabl】e plastic by cultivating natural polymers made by micro-organisms t/h】at feast on 】se【a【weed al\gae.Or【/ganic plastics f/ro/m avocado s\eedsAvocado seeds are a h/uge industrial /waste 【in Mexic】o, henc】e a lo\cal c【ompany/ came【 up\ 】wi【th th/\e idea of【】 giv【i\ng 【them a \/second life\ as biodegrad/ab/le plastic. Biofas】e today produces /avocad【o【 seed 】stra【ws a//nd cutler\ies. Accor/ding to th\em, as i/t is foo【d w】aste, it/ reduces the costs/, so\ th】ey claim that they\ can produ\ce it for th\e same pri】c\e as】 regula【r palstics.The precious material in l】o】bsters' exoskeletonS/he\llfish, such as lobste【rs, could o/ffe/r a solution to the scourge of si【ngle-use plastic thanks to a bio-polymer in their shells called chitin. 】A London/-based startup The Shellworks is developi【ng\ a met】hod to transform thi/s material -】 normall/y destine】d\ for the 】rubbish\ /\ti【p - 【into】 a novel bioplastic that/'【s\ both biode/grada】ble and recyclabl】e.Click on t【he video a】bove to learn h【ow l/o【bst/ers can provide an alternative \for single-use p\lastic.Share this\ article More from lifepisX

Wi2V“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207\The sout\h-west Africa】n /country of An/gola is wakin】g up to /its\ tour/ism potenti/al, offering opportunitie/s for vi【sitor【\s and /in【vestor\s a【lik【e./One of the】 most unspo\ilt regions\ is th】e Namibe deser/t, wh/ich/\ stretches 2,000 kil【ometr】es acr【o\ss t】hree countri【es.T【he dese\rt runs all 】the way from t/he/ Iona Nation\al Park in A】\ngola, t】hrough/【 Namib【【ia, to South Af\ric\a&r】squo;s 】Kalahari Desert - more 【than 80,000】 square kilometres. You \can\ drive for hour/s along the Corridor of the Tides, where the desert meets the ocean.N】a/m\ib】e mean】s ‘’vast pla\ce’&rsquo【;\ in the local la\ng/uage and it lives up【 to its name &/nd【ash; a tourism wonderl【and with a s\p\ect】acula\r coastlin【e.A\ndrea\ Mar【tins【【 runs an eco-touris】m lodge perched abo【ve a 】grotto on the Atlantic Oc】ean. Praia do \Soba, meaning &lsqu\o;Beach of the Chief’, offe【/rs mag【/nificent view【s of sandstone \cliff/s c】/arve\d by na【ture.【Mar】ti【ns says】 the locatio【n was dis/cov\ered by her f\ather and\ the【 family/ decided to inv】est there.She comp】/a\r/es her adventuro/us fat\her to the movie character Crocodile Dundee.“This wa\s the\ l】a】/st lost paradise of】 Angola】, beca】use no one fo/und this 【plac【e, becau\s【e there was】\ no road, /no/ access, and my Crocodile 【Dundee, m【y father, the/ Ango】lan Crocod/ile Du】】ndee, arr\ived here, he m【ade】 a road, an】d he found this amazi】ng place.&rdq】uo/;The ind】i】vidual hut【s are //beautif【ully decorated, and there are plans to build more. The/re are also plans to provide luxury campsites for so-cal】led glam/ping tourism.Marti【ns tol【d Business Angola: “W\e 】want t/o make a bigger r】e/staurant, a conference room,/ more rooms and we want to (【do) glamping, to have【 al【l kinds of people here.&rd\/quo;Martin Bremer, a S/out/h African businessman, already ru】】/ns】 a g】lamping compa【【ny, giving tourists 【a/ chance to t【ravel dee【【p into the heart of Nami】be\ pro/vi【nce.Bremer\ has travelle】d extensiv】ely th【rough southern Africa as part\ of his stone business.&】ldq/uo;We visited all sorts of &l【squo\;off the beaten track’ (places), a】ll the uncha\rted sites. And i】t was just a\ n/a\/tural thi\ng to do to bring p【eople into this area./”Bremer/ says co【mp\ared to /other countri【es in southe/rn Africa, An【gola is ripe for investm】ent in tourism.&l【dquo;It【's op】e\n, 】it's becoming much easier to for【m partnerships. They】've changed m\any of the la\【ws to make it ea【sier for /people t\o invest. There ar/e great c【ompan/ies in Angola.”It&rsquo/\;s hope/d【 a/ 500 mi【l/l【ion-euro expansion of the southe\rn port of Namibe\ w】ill have flow-on eff【/ects for t/ourism a】nd \leisure.Japanese company Toyota is be【hi\nd the investment, wh\ich will 】doub\le the size /of the】【 po】rt, connect\ed to the region by rail, while adding tou\rism and lei/sure facilities.Nuno Borges da Silva, \Chairman of \Toyo\ta Angola, told Business An【gol\a: “The port will /be a big support fo【r tourism/ ves【se\ls】, because】【 now they 】don't hav】e conditions/ to 【bring vessels and tour【i【sts. But w/hen this p【ort【 is ready it wil/l be very beautif/ul, and y/ou can al\so d【oc】k b】ig vessels.&r】【dq】/uo;【He said for【eigners can invest \in An\gola without any local/ partners.&ld【quo;Let'】s say it's more open to the peop【le to come and \invest w【ithout any difficulty, a\ny problem,【” he said.【Sha【re this articleC【/opy/pas\te the/ article video embed link be/low:CopyShareTweetShar\esendShareTweetSharesendMor【e【Hide\Share【SendS【】hareShar/eShareSen】\dSh【/a】reSh\ar\e【More aboutTouri/smFauna and】 Fl/oraEnvironment\al prot】ectionAn\golaAfrica Bro【wse today�】【;s /t【ag】s 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsFudC

NBUqText sizeAaAaWalking】 along the shore of the Dead Sea give【\【s you a c\lear vision of how 【qui\/ckly【 na/ture \reacts to】 human intervention. The\ Dead S/ea h/as been dying for de\cades,\ and】 the result is \al/ready obv】ious.Nestled betwee】n Israel and the Palestinian T【erritories 】and /Jordan, /the Dead Sea has been le\aving its mark /【【on mankind since biblical times. Famous for its extreme sa】】linity, /an/ Israeli a】r/tist 【has even】 been i【nsp【ired by that and use t/he\ expanse as【 her stu】dio\ to create cry/stal art pi\eces.Since the histori【cal lake has be【en exploited by modern indus】try, the【 wate【r】 】level is【 g】radually lowering. T【he m【iner/al extraction and the diversio\n of the \Riv/er Jord【an&r\s】/quo;s/ water /have been\ big c/ontributors to the phenom】enon.】As the sp\ectacularly shrinki\ng wat\er level leaves it】s mar】k on the shore,\ d\angerous sinkholes appear al【ong the lake - the 】】result of \the br】iny wat/e\r r/ecedin/g unde【rgrou】nd. /In 199【0 th】e】re were a little 】over 100/ sinkholes, accordi\ng to the Geological/ Survey o\f Israel. Today the】re are more t/】h/an【 6,000. This led 【to the n】ecessary clo/【sure【\ of some s【hore seg【ments hence those tourist spots became ghost to】】wns.Click on th】e video above \to learn more ab】out what happens with the Dead/ S】【【ea.Share this【 article 】 More\ from plac/esqwD7

7xhtIn a move designed to kickstart what CE【O Ma】rio Di Mauro desc】ribes as &ldq\uo;a ne】w digital game&rdquo【;, internatio【nal service prov/ider Sparkle】 laid a sy【mbolic 【fo\undation /stone 】for the comp/any&rs【quo;s lates【t data centre on 21 Ja\nuary\. Situate/d j】ust 】o/utside Athens, \/th/e 【new site will hou】se Sparkle’s fourth d【ata centre i【n Greece, and【 \forms part of a【n /ongoing\ strateg【y 】to invest in t】he country【.Metamorfosis\ II will /incorporate the/ lates【t environme/ntally fr【ie】ndly technology, and wi\ll offer over 6,】/00】0m2 of data co-location space, 】allowing 】for the expansion o【f a client b\ase that cur】rently include】s serv/ice pro/viders, syste【\m in/tegrators, local a【nd i】nt【ernation/al bu/sinesse】/s, content providers, instit/utions and OTT media services.A key play/er in /\the\ global 】telec/oms marketAs the international a】rm of Italian telecommunications giant TIM, 】Sparkl\e has a 】prese【nce in 3 countries, with a proprietar】y \backbone of/ around 53【0,000 ki【\lo】metres of fibre optics【 a/cross four c【o/ntinents. It offers a wi【de range of/ IP, data, cloud/ and 【voi/c/e servic【es to customers, ensur【ing excep】tion\al se/\curit【y 【and relia】bility.The/ f【\ocus 【for it【s data centre/s is Europe, an】d specific/ally the Medit\erranean area. Spar】kle has【 been 】operating in Greece since 2001, and already has one data c/】entre】 in Cre【te and two m】ore just outsid/e【 Athens/.Th/ese have a com\bined space of 8,000m2, but the n/ew【 Meta/【morfosi\s II wil/l add to this capa/cit\y wi【th /clos【e to 6,000m2 】of add\itional /c\o-loca\tion sp\ace. As with the company’s】 existing cen】/tres 】in Greece, Metamo【\rfosis\ 【II will b【e】 fully integrated in Nib\ble, the /new pan-Med/i【terranea【n photonic network, and i】\n Seabone, Sparkle】's IP/MPLS internet back/bon/【e, providing high-performance services and indu】s\try-benchmark s】pe】eds.Environmental su】stainability as stra【tegi/c priorityPlans for /the co/nst】ruction \of the new com/plex put envir【onmental concerns fron【【【【t and centre. &ld/quo;The new /European Com】mission has ma【de sustainability the\ \key iss\ue 】in the fut\ure】 policy of Europe,”【 say】/s Salvatore Rossi, chairman of TIM. &l【d\q\uo;E【very private compan】y acting in 】the m/arket has to understand that this 】is a business opportunity, no\t a cost.\&】rdquo;\Sparkle’s\ commi【tment to environmental sust】\ainability\ is not】hi】n】g new, a【nd\ its business operations】 were the first 】of their kind in Greece /to be awarded with\ the ISO 14001:2015/】 certifi【cation, wh【ich recog\n】ise】s the company’s e】nvironmental-pr】otection/ me\asures.【S】parkl【/e&/rsquo;s Is\tanbul d\a/【ta 】centre is h】eld to be someth/【ing of a blue\print in /the ind】ustry, and a re\cent expansion and renovation 】saw th\e addition 】of state-o】f-t\he-art te【chno/logy【】 【that enabled the company to increase c【ap【acity b】y 40 p】ercent /\while reducing\ consump】tio/n by 14 pe\rcent.A key factor was the introduction of lithium-ion /(Li-ion) batteries, an innovatio】n that will also play a role in th/e Metam\orfo【si\s II /cent/r\e, along with the latest en【ergy-efficien/t light, /】/power and cooli【ng systems. Thes/e will jointly allow a carbon-footprin/t reduction o\f around 28,000 ton】s a year, or【 】/– i/n simpler ter【ms &nd】ash/; 】will require close to half the energy req/uired to run a \regular data centre of comparable size and capaci【t\y.Reco】gnising local potentialBut 】technolog/y is onl【/y half the pi】cture. For five years in【 a row 【Sparkle has won Infocom awards that acknow】ledge the /com【pany&rs/quo;【s success in the cloud and data indus】tries,/ as well as its/ contribution to the d【e/velopm【/ent 】o】\f t】he Greek m】arke】t/ overall.\As t/he green shoots of recovery emerge fro】m Gr\eece&rs【quo;【s lo【ng per\i/od of s/tagnation and aus】】terity, Sparkle se\es boun\dless possibiliti【es in the region. “For us, it&rsquo/;s】 ver/y important to develop our】 activities in the 【centre of the Mediterranean area,” says Alessa【\ndro Pa\】nsa, cha【i【rman of S】parkle. “】We want to extend ou/r activities in Asia,\ i【n Africa, in 【\ot/her parts of】 the wor\ld, but 】Athens\ will be t】he focal point 【for ou【【r next /a】ctivity./【”The ques\t】i【on is not 【merely one o】f】 /e【conomics. Mario 】Di Mauro is ke/en 【to leverage the vast pot/\ential he se\/es in the country/’s human capital. &ldq】uo;We have \here/ p\eople\ who are cap\】abl\e of pla/ying this inn】o】vation 【role, and these people a【re /impo【\【rt【ant.&r\dquo;Laying】 o\ut his】 】vis【ion f】or the future, Di】 Mauro predicts that th】【is i】nvestment \in Greece and its workforce will not only b】en【】efit the company’s operatio/ns wit/hin the country, but t/hat he hopes to “\】【c】】apit/al/i【se on al】l this k】nowledge /for all 】the global operation【s of Sparkle.”Share this】 articleCopy/past/e the article video embed link \be【low:CopyShar/eTweetSharesendShareTweetSharesendMoreH\ideShareSendShareShareShar】eSendShareShareMo\【re abo/utTelecommun【ic【ation\Techno【log【yBig Da\taI【nvestmentEnvironmental protection / \ Browse【 today&【#039【;】s tagsXblP

LOMbHow the EU stamped dow\n on de/c\ades of【 illeg\al【 fishing \in T\hai\landXfYT

n1OSDubai&r】\squ/o;s airports ha\ve banned all single\ use plastics as t【h\】e city works towards a plas/tic-free futur】e.It comes as the attitu/de/ towards si】ng\l】e use plastics /i\/s changi\ng./ In Dubai, 90 pe】r cent of peop】le say they are making a conscious effor/t\ to reduce their own plastic waste consumption】.Nearly fo【ur in five say t\hey rec/ycle more no/w than they d/id five years a\go. A\n/d one in four people say they're en】couraged to recycle more by corporations championin【g pla】】stic-free initiatives.Dubai Inte\rnational 【Airport \along with Dubai W】orl\d Ce\ntra】l welcome a/lmost 9】0 million passeng\【ers each y/\ear【. B\//ut with 【those passengers comes 5,/5【A fish\y】 b/usiness: EU poli\ticians are risking o】ur fu【t【ure by 】gambling on our nat】】ural resource/s | View tonnes of pla/stic.The airports】&r/squo; operator, /Dubai Airports, banned all single use plastics from 【inside the terminal a】t 【t\he beginning of】 this year/.Th】at【 means that plastic cutle【ry, water bottle【s, dri【nking straw】s/, packaging and polythene bags are all banned from cafes and【 rest\aurants.Eugene Barry, D】ubai A\irp\orts’ executi【ve vi/c【e /president (commercia】l), told F/ocus: 】&ldqu】o;\Ni/nety f【i】ve per \cen【t of our partners have actua】lly made the pledge to switch from plastic to appropriate and re】levant substi\tutes for 【som/e of the pr/oducts that are used in catering and/ 】r【etail a【\cross the airport.”【The /operator hope】s it】's a strategy that m/ight become a\ t】em【plate for o\/t/her major transpo\rtation h】ubs and bus【inesses】.“Thi【s is ver】y much 】/the early stages of a long/ journey, I 【believe, t【o h\/ave a more e【nvi【ronmentally frie/ndly ap【proach /to managing bu【/【\sines】ses,&\rdquo; Barry said.\To see the a/mount of plastic that's building up in our s【and an【d in our oceans is jus\t cr】azy. Tom Arnel, Common\ Gro】unds founder】【 】 / \ Dubai&】rs/q】uo;s 700 h【otels are already【 look\in【g \【【at alternati【v\es, s/uch as switching\ water bottles from plastic to glass/.Plastic key cards could a/lso be a thing of /the /pa】st, as develop】ers /【l【ook i/nto switc\hing them to wood-b/ased materials.The eco packagin\g company Avani is one firm offering plast\ic-f/ree】 a/lte/rn】atives, including a bag 】made from cassa\va, 】a ch】eap and common 】root【 vegetable.The ma【terial is bio/【deg/radable a【nd compostable/, breaking down over a perio【d of month/s on land【 or】 at【 sea.Peter Avram, 【\man【】agin【】g director of Avani Middle East, sai/d: &/l】dqu/o;Until /a 【couple【 of years ago we had no 【major solutions, pa/rt/icularly for 】the bag.&】rdquo;Bu【t the cassava b】ag, a 】mixtu】r\e of starch, vegeta\bl/e oil /and organix r/\e】sins, has changed the equation.Avram】 said the 【product has helped re/duce t/he 】use of plastic bag\【s by mor\e than 50 per\ c\en】t.To【m Arnel, founder of the Comm【on /Grounds coffee c】hain, is on【e 【company ma】king 】the sw【itch【.“As a father of three kids, I take【 my family to t【he beach all the /ti/me 【and t/o see the 】amount of/】 \plasti\c th【at's building u/p in o】ur sand and in our ocea】ns i/s just crazy.&rdq】uo;His\ company has 】ph】\a】/sed out pl\a/stic c【ups and bowls.“We serve 【th【ousands【】 of 【cust/omers a week and every little bit【】 that we /can do really 【does go 【a long way 】to help the situ/at【ion. 】It's just\ 】about mak【ing sure that you do the work to\ understand where the single u\se pl/a/【stic is. All \of our plastic cups【, all/ of our takeaway 】bowls and p】lates and cutlery, you know, 】replenishing those 【a】reas of o\ur kit【chens with t】hings that we kne\w【 work great fo/r the environment.&rd【quo;Arnel s\aid the feedback 【f\ro/m customers had b【ee【n “amazin【g”.&ld】quo】;As l【ong as 】everyon\e's d】oi【n/g t】heir bit an【d understanding their/ impact, /we should 】be】 able to make a 】change togethe【r\.”Share 【t【his a】rticl/eCop/y/paste th\/e article video e/mbed link b/elo【w:C/opyShareTwee【tSharesendShar【eTweetSharesen【dMoreHideShareSend/ShareShareShareSendShar/eShareYou/ might als/o like 】 The appetite for l\ocal sustain】abl】e food【 p【ro/duce in the U/nited Arab 【Em/irates 【 【 \ \ 【 \ New era【 for B【enidorm as r\esort embraces sustainabili/ty 【 \ \ Health innovations - the 】young Europe【ans /dreaming up c//re\ative solutions for healthca】r\e 】 More 【aboutR【e】cycl】i】ngEnvironmental 【protectio】/nDub【ai /United Arab E/mirat\es】 Most viewe/d / 】 【 【 【 / 【 Beijing is their campus: Insid【e the Chines【e capital’s life-ch/anging stud/y tours \ \ / 9 places to visi】t on your【 cul/t】ural trip around】 Croatia // \ 【 \ \The Palm J\um\eirah: Du/bai�【39;s symbol of cre【ativity and ambiti/on 】 \/Market】s, coffee and stre】et【 /art: discove/ring Zagreb's secret delights 【】 】 【 】 \ \ \ Greek islands of his【tory and culture 【 】 \ \ \/ Br\owse today�】39;s 】t【agsLS49

3zPKFor 50 yea\r】s an Israeli【 o【il comp【【any has 】kept bathers 【off a Red Sea bea/ch near】 t/he resort of Eilat bu】t \it co【/uldn’t 】stop sea life from flouri\shing.I【n a wor\ld where co】【r】al r】eefs are s】hrink\ing rapidly, the one \in Eila\t has grown.Due/ to /a lack of human interf】e【rence,】 a spectacular /coral reef blo/】sso】med o】v【er time attracting exotic /fi】sh \and/【 dolphins to th/is 【aquatic paradi\se.The 300-me\tre-long be】ach was handed back to the publi\c a year an/d a half ago after the】 Eilat Ashkelon P【ipeline 】Company (EAPC) 【scaled back it\s operat】io【ns.Now, with access lift【【e/d, int】erest is /mounting 【f\rom scuba divers \an\d tourist】s/ alike w/ho want【 to vi】sit.In response, Israel's Na/ture and Par/ks Authority decided to relocate the cora\ls for their own pr/otecti】on so \the /ind】ustri/al de/bris left /】】by E【APC\ could be removed.S【hare this articleCopy/paste】 t【he article 【video embe】/d link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendS】hareTw】eetSharesendMoreHideShareSendSh【areShare\ShareSendSh/areShareY/ou\ might also 【like 】 '\;Israel is no l/onger a democracy�】9;: Netan\yahu accused of exp【loi】ting coron/avirus to sa/ve career 【 / 】 \】 / / Israel e\】lection: Exit p/olls give Netanyah】u nar\r/ow/ lead / 【 \ \ 】 】 】 / 】 \ \/ / 】 】 Palestinian P\resident Ab】bas cu】ts ties with Israel a】nd US 】over peace plan / More aboutCora/lsIsrael\Envir【onmentEnvironmental protectio【noil 【industry】Touri\sm Browse today's tag】sL2rs

PzCN【Coron【【/avirus in Europe:】 W【h】/y has Portu【gal not been as ba】dly hit by /COVID-19 a\s n\e/ighbour【 S\pai【n?0NDm

C0nAText s】izeAaAaBlack /cavi【ar was \a delicacy alread【y back i\n the 】】days of Gen\ghis Khan in the\ 12’s. In the 1550&rsqu\】】o;s】, Fra/ncois Rabela\is called it/ the finest pre-main-course/ tre\at out there. The kings and the tsars【 of Euro\pe】 enjoyed th\i】】【s\ fine food throughout the centuries. I【n our days, the roe of stur\geon is synonymous with luxurious living on 】televis】ion (think James Bond) and】 in real life.Getting the c】aviar, h/owever, is in】herently unsustainab\le: to get the fish eggs, f\e【male fish a】re hauled out【 of the waters s【hortly before they are me/ant to spawn and 【sliced open for t/hei/r row, which r】esu/lts in their death. So it is【 hardly a surprise that the s】【tu【rgeon’【s numbers h/a【ve been in an ala\rmingly rapid de【cline, so much so that in【 2001 a UN conventio/n banned fishing sturge\on in \its natu\ral habit/at altogether.A young sturgeon \fishK【asperskianTh】e key wo/rds are &ldq\uo;in its natural habitat&rdq\uo;. The ban/ made the br【ightest/ minds in bio/logy thin】k of \w】ays t【o get /】t【he female sturgeon’s precious cargo without bre【ak【ing the/ law. To circum\vent/ this piece of legislation, the most ob\vious \method was 】t\o cr/】eate fi【sh farms, whic\h technically do not /constitute a nat】ural environment. Such fish farms are quite 【c】ommon in China a/n】d slightly less so in Russia and Nort】h Amer\ica. B【ut to get this 【caviar to th\e】 European market 】with/out【 it \rottin\g, C】hinese pr【】oducers are【 forced to 】use/ /che/mical preservati\ves, which a/re banned/ i】n Japan a\nd in the US – b【ut 【not in Euro【pe.I\f you】&rsqu/【】o;re a fan of 】the delicacy, he/re&rsquo\;s /the good news: there is a h【andful of b/lack caviar producers \/out t【here/ that【 】are\】 \do\ing it【 sustainably &ndash\】; without killing the fis/h – thanks to a method wh\ereby\ the eggs are “mas】saged&【\】rdquo\; out right before spawn\ing. The/ sligh/tly 【worse news is that】 tho【se fish eggs】 /are pa\steu【rized, meaning the end product is not fresh but boil【ed.Luckily,【】 one produc\/er stan/ds out in 】par\t/icul//ar. 【/Swiss-based Kasperski【an purc/hased the right to use a 【technology pat\en/t\ed by Russian bi/ologist Li】liya Kop\ylenko and ar】e the o【nly produ\c\er 【in the world that provides discernin【】/g foodies “caviar\ with life”, w【hich is sustainable, /et【hical/ and as fresh a\/s it can be】】\ all at the sam/e t【ime. Th】e company wa/s founded in 2014 by 【Nes【tle】&\rsquo;s C/【EO Peter Bra\beck-Letmath】e and his【 long-\time friend Konst\antin Sidorov.Konstan\tin 【Sidoro【v (secon/d \from righ\t) at an\ eventKasperski】an“Producing】\ h】igh qual/i】ty bla】ck c/aviar in a sustainable 】way, withou】t killing th】e/】 fish, is e】xtremel】y co【mpl\ex and costly. The difficulty lies not s【o much in ki【lling or【 not killing the fish, but rather in how to process 】the fish eggs a【fterwards to gu\/arantee 】their f/reshness without r/】esort/in/g to the use 【of ch/emicals,” Konstantin Sidorov explained.Fresh/ caviar 【is a live【 prod】uct, 【much like oysters, so you cannot \keep it 【fresh for long. One of t/he biggest problems【, accordin\g to K【onsta/ntin,【 is that tra\ditio\nally/ the p】eak season f\o/r black caviar consum\ption is aroun\d【 the tim\e of C【hristmas and New Yea【r but the s\turg\eon 【usually spawns in \late】 s】prin\g, ar】ound May. There is a \speci【a【l vacuum te【\c\hnol】ogy that c】an k】eep t/he caviar fresh up【 to three months witho/ut havi/ng 】to process i】t or add any kind of pre】servatives /but that bri【ngs \us 【only to August - \still a 】way aw】ay from the /holiday season.The paten】ted technolo\gy used by Kasperski【an \at their fi【s】h fa/rm allows for to\】tal control of】 the\/ fish&rsq【u/o;s environment: what \it eats【 (a factor tha/t can/】 rea】lly affect【【 the】 qualit/y \of the ro【e】), as well as the lig/ht and the tem】p/erature, meaning they can simulate late spring in【 September by\ increas】ing the\ wat\er t】empera\ture and amount of light.\ And【 thus【 c/】onsumer【】s ha\ve fresh 】and su【staina/ble caviar just in time for the \holidays. View this p/ost o】n InstagramThe\ KASPERSKIAN \Cavi\ar with Life is simpl\y】 unique】 ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWithLif【e #S\wissMadeA post s【hared by KASPERSKIA\N (@kas】per【ski\an_cavia】r) o【n Oct 31, 2018 at /1/1:10am PDT“The pool w/e use is an incredibly complex 【structure so th【e】\ costs of the【 te】chnology and main/tenance are very high, which【 reflects on the price of t】he end \product. \Quality product 【can&rs\quo;t be cheap by defini【tion./ And with w\ealth also 【comes a/ certain desire to consume co/nsciously, which means】 that】 our c/u】stomer】s are re/ady to spend more on【 a produ/ct t/hat d\i/【【d no】t cost the f\ish its l\ife. U】nfor】tunately, in our 【day and 】ag】e it&rsq/uo;s easier 】\to k【/ill a life rather th【an sav/e it so we f\eel a\ moral responsibility to sho\w that that needn&rs】quo;t always be the case,” Konstantin c/larified.The d\ecision to /b】ase p\r/oductio\】n in Sw】itzerland/ w/as\ rather/ o/bv/ious for Kons/【tantin and Peter. This country ha\s th/e h/ighest quality con【trol and als】【o rigid regulation【 w】hen it comes to animal welfa\r\e.&ld】quo;Switzerla/nd is t/he only /place that bans b【oiling lobst\ers alive】,/ f】or examp】le. \We receive weekly checks that ar【e very serio\us and thorough】【【. Th】is creates a trust in S\wiss product/s and this /is also】 wh/y our 】product is/ more expensi\ve. We【 cou/ld\ have based our /production in Russia】, which in the minds of 】most is 】t/he h\ome/ of black caviar, but \no one would\ trust that we use sustaina【ble and /ethical methods t/o extract/ it,” Konstantin said. Vie\w this pos/t on InstagramA lunch of dre/ams at Cuck\oo Sushi Club in Zer】mat【t with some Alaska/n Crab Roll with Caviar and Ma【ndar/in Snow/, Lan【goustine Roll with Truffle Sno】w and fin【\al】ly Kasp/erskian Caviar with Life/ ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWi/t【hLife #Sw/issMadeA post shared by KASPER\SKIAN【 (@kaspe\【rskia/n_caviar) on Dec 30, 2【018 at 10:02am PSTBlack caviar /in Zermatt, Switze】rlandI\n a/ddition to the commitment to /the fish’s welfare, \/Kasperskia【n aims to reduc\e【 its impac\/t on the envi/ro】n/ment b\y producin】g \its own e】lectricity \t/hrough so【lar panels and trea/ting /al【l water\s to preserve【\ the\ lo\cal wild fauna and f/lora.Over the years, the caviar producer has made friends in high place】s【 and partner\ed up 【w/ith esteemed\ brands such \as LV】MH, Dom Pérignon an/d Christie】&rsq】/u/o【;s. Aside fro\m ap\plying susta【ina【ble methods/ 【to bl】ack caviar producti】on, Kasperskian also spon\sors/ cha\rit【y】 events lik/e Russian super 【mod【el Natalia Vodionova’s N】aked Heart Gala d/in/ners 【and the】 M\onte Carlo Gal\a\ for the Global Ocean.At the moment, thos】e wh【o wan/\t to t【aste the upscale\ treat can\ find it/ in S】wiss stores like 】Globus【 and \Migros, Swiss sk】i resorts like Zermatt and St. \Moritz\ or 【London clu【bs/ and restauran【ts】 lik【e 67 Pall Mall【, 】/Ocean House, Marivan\na\,【 Bea】st and a f/ew others. View this post o/n /InstagramK】\asperskian C【aviar at 【Mari Vanna Restau/rant (@mar】ivannalondon) in L【ondon Knightsbr】idge. #Ca\/viarWi\thLife #MarivannaA \p】ost shared b\y /KASPERSKIAN (@kasperskian_cavia/r) o【n\ Dec】 7, 2018 at 1/0:/12am】 P【STKaspers】kian caviar i\/n Lon\don's Marivanna\ 【restaurantShare this articl/e / More from wellness5l3J

DrByLiving Recommends | Rewilding our relati】onship with ou//r wardrobekgXE

5NyrThe big, bea/【utiful Baltic Sea 【/hides /a dirty secret in its 377,00】0km of water.A\ 【number of agricultural/ spills has turned t】he Baltic【 into one of /t/he most /pol】lu\ted】 seas in】 the wor】ld, due to excess nitrogen \and phos\phorus lacing it】s wat【ers.This process of eutrophication ha\s【 led to \the de\pl/etion \/of oxyg】en and /an【 overg\】rowt【h of algae in the body o【f wa】ter, 【but not 【al\l h】ope/ is 【】lo】st.\Eutrophication ex/p】lai【nedAn unlik】ely assist/an】tMussel farms lik\e【 Kieler Meeresfarm【 in the Germ【an port city of Kie】l are ho/p】ing 【to ma【ke a dif】f【eren】ce in th/e 【Baltic'】s/ increasin\g【ly di【fficult fight\ against algae.Hundreds o【f tho】usands of th\ese mighty mol/lus\cs wo/rk to filter the water eve/ry day by\ eating their way through microsc】opic a\lg】ae.Kieler Meeresfarm 】is just one f】arm taking pa\rt in Balt/ic Blue Growth, an experimental【 Europe/an pro】ject coordinated based in\ Sweden's Ostergötland region.Th【e】 p/roj【ect is worth 4.6 million Euros, with/ 3.6 million 】Euros coming from regional aid under the EU Coh/esion Policy. 18【 partners in six B【altic co【untrie】s are taking p/art.All six participating farms/ are locate】d in importa【nt】 strategic locations across th\/e Baltic region/.The farms are all in close co】n\t【act with \each】 other, sharing techn/iques and /ideas despite having diffe/rent\ experiences.Kieler】 Me】eresfarm f】ounder Tim Sr【a\ufenberge/r \says '】'I'm having【 here diffe【rent【 conditions th【\an in Sweden. So w/ha【t 】works for me doesn't really wo】rk in】 Swed\en and/ vi/ce versa b\ut we 【can talk\ to each other and have that \shari【ng of i/deas.''T【he wate】\r quality and transparency is mea】sured twice a year and researc\h】ers sa】y that the results ar【e conclusive.1212121212121212More than/】 just mu【ssels\NGO Coas\【tal Union Germany, EUCC, is 】als】o helping to raise soci】al awa/ren/ess on imp/ro\ving water qual】ity.EUCC has cre【at【e】d a number of databases and learning tools for intern【a】tional networ】ks, providing\ relevant i】】nform【/at【ion, wo】rkshops /and 】conferenc\es about/ the im/porta/nce /of usin】g】 musse/【ls to impro】v/e wa】te/r qualit/【y i/n \the Baltic Sea.Looking to the futureThe project's ultima】te aim is \to bring r【eal change to the【 Baltic Sea region.This i】\s 【expected to be done in revolutionis/ing\ the us】e o/f /musse/】l meal for ani【mal feed. The【 project is expe【】cted to also at\tract int/erest from broader \markets,/ at/tracting /entrepreneur/s /and in\vestment in mussel m\eal as a viable alternative to curre【nt\ animal feed.Watch s】ome of【 ou【r social media coverageShare this】 ar】t【icleC\opy/】paste the ar\//ticle video em【be\】d link below:Cop】y【\ShareTweetSharesendShareTweetSharese\ndMoreHideShareSendSh】areShareShareS【end/ShareShareYo】u mi/ght also like/ / \ / 【 Devise【 P【roject: Ireland puts the spotli\ght on digital/ SMEs / \ / 【 More aboutContamination of waterEn【vironmental 】protecti】/\onF/aun】a and F【loraGermany Browse today'\;s tagspGAf

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XVn3】9;Em【otion【s run】nin/g high&#/039; in Brexit blame g\a\mehHmK

1.YOjjDanish billio\n】aire plans to b/uild idyllic vil\lage in【 Sc\ot/\land to stop land】 becomi//ng de\relictVgN1

2.UlIjFive new ways to help the env【ironmentRspX

3.5j36\Te】xt sizeAaAa/A s\how【case of t】ho/usands of completel\y sustainable f\abrics is co】ming to London, or】ganiser The Sustainable【 Angle has announced.【The not-for-profit o/r/g/anisation has been a rele】ntl】\ess/ 【s【upporter of innovative/ lower\ carbon solutions to fashio/n&rsquo【;s biggest problems【 since 2010 and hopes that this/ \ev/ent 】will encourag/e ev/en/ more /designe】】rs and creators【 to adopt 】respo/n【sible solutions.】This will \be the ninth e/dit】ion of the Fut】ure Fabrics Expo which is the l\argest sho【wcase of sustainable fabrics of its k】ind. /With each f\abr【ic, informa/tion about where it has com/e from and 】/the/ environm\e/nta【l footpri/nt\ of【 its】 manufacture w\il/l be/【 provided. I【ncreas【ing tr\an/sparency in【 how our clothing i/s made is on】e\ way to he/lp bot【h designers and co【nsumers to 【make responsi\ble choice【s.Materials /o\n show will】 include 】the i/ncreas\i【ngly popular TENCEL Lyoce\ll and Modal as well as【 several fa/brics th】at take an innovative approach to post-cons【】umer recycling. Wi\th fashion waste /firm【ly in】 【the spotl【igh【t this season, there is a real dri【ve from /\consum】ers towa/rd more circular soluti【ons\】.These m\ode【rn approa\】ches will be e/xhibited alongside co/mpanies that ch】ampion t/rad\it\ional sustainable ma】te/rials/ like line/n and bast. Although less common i/n modern designs, these ancient f【】ab/rics are biodeg】radable and water-efficient. 【The plant fi【b【res fr】om 【】【whi】ch\ they are grown can ev\/en sequester C【O/ from the atmosphere.Founders of the expo, 】The【 Su】stainable Angle, hope t】o change the fash/ion i】ndustry \for the bet/ter s【o that, instea/d of stri】ppin/g resources an/】d p/oll\uting environments, \it can【 have a 】po/sit/i/ve impa【ct on n\ature an\/d the communities that 】\make o】ur cloth/es.Read/ More | W\【hat is Tencel? \T//h【e s\ustainable fabric e/v【eryone is 】talking /aboutClaire\ Bergk/am\p, Global Director of S【us【ta】inability and Innovation, Stella McCartney (left) in/ 【convers\ation/ with Orsol/a de Castro, Co-foun】der of Fashion Revolution】 (right)【\.Suzanne Plunkett /The 【Sustaina】\ble AngleAs well as showing off materials th\at designers can u】se t】o /decrease the e】nviro】nmental impact of t\heir own 【de】signs, the F/uture】 F【abrics\ Expo will also h【o\st panels to h\elp】/ ed/ucate atte\n】de/es and fac\ilitate discussion between industry exp【e【rts. Panels for\ the ninth Future F【abrics Expo will b/e】 focus\ed around r【egenera】t\i】ve, circul/ar ap】proaches to sust\ainable des【ign and how fashion can be a “powerful force /for positive change”.Future\【/ Fashion ExpoS\uzanne Plunkett /The 【Sustainable AngleAt 】a /p】an/el at last 【year’s event, Claire Bergkamp, Glob/al Director of Susta】】】inability and \Innovatio】n at Stella\ McCart/ney emphasised t\he value【 of eve\nts like t\his i】n helping to eradicate unsustainable mat】er\ial\s from t【he【 fashion in【du\/stry; “We have to \repl/ace them with i/nnova】t\ive, sustainable alternatives. The o/】ther half of inno】vati】on in the【】 future of fabrics has to be about rethinkin】g t【he syst】em【s 【tha】t we /have now…/【How can we find lower-im【pact ways o\f【】 】creating things?”.Part of the /Expo last year al】】so in【cluded two curated areas dedic\ated to fashion bra\nds fully embraci\ng responsib/le s】our\cing and circularity in thei【/r 【collections. New collaborati/on/s【 between leading designers and companies c/reating inno】vative new material\ technologies are the ideal outcome from this event.Suzanne Plunkett /The 】Sustainable A】ngle【The \【event will take place from the 29th-3】0th Januar/y 2020 at\ Victoria House, Bloomsbur\y Square, 】L】ondon. Tick/et registratio/n f/or de【【signers/ and brands /can be/ found h\er【e.Share this article \ 】More /from l\ifeGljE

4.gxioWhat is/ enviro】nment【al crime 】a【nd sho\uld /you re\p\ort it?【/ 【euYd

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oZ生物产业5i

lnsd【Text si/zeAaAaOnce upon a time, there were th/ree bro\thers\...the story o/f the second/ best rest【au/rant i【n【 the w【orld, called El Cell\er de 【Can\ Roca, 【could 【start like a fable but thi\s story i\s actually real【. The Roc】a brothers' 【passion f【or co/ok\i\ng led them to open their 【restaurant in 1986\ and it has received thr【e【e Michelin-stars since then.Thei】r commitment is【 not limited to \cuisine, th【e restaur】ant operates【 a zero-w【ast】e【 p/olicy. Celle】r de C\an Roca&rsq【uo;s】 philo/so/phy consists in enhan/cing the loc】al【 products a】nd favouring sustainabi\lity.Ea/rl【ier /this year the restau/ran\t got int\o t\he spotlight bec】ause of finding 【a\ c/reative way t【/o make a good use\ of their 【plastic; they hav】e teamed up with Span/ish des】igner Andreu Carul\la, who \transformed t\】he p/la】stic waste of the/ restaurant into hex\ago】nal stools.And now the three brother】s 【have found 【another /way to \r【ecycle 【/some /of the res】t/aurant's【 waste, a project/ called Roca Rec【icla】.Click on the video\ 【above to learn more about /th/i】s restaurant's initiative t\o raise en【vironmental awareness.Share thi\s artic【le / \ Mo】re from wellness68ac

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5YmEText sizeAaAaThere is a saying【【 that goes "one man's trash is another man's treasure【." And, in this cas\e, one musician in Egypt i/s doing j\us\t t/】hat - upc\yc/ling waste and t/urnin\g it int\o treasur/e.Shady Ra】bab 】has be】【en t/urning all\ kinds of/ trash into musical instrumen\ts in his workshop /in /Luxor. He】 came up\/ with the id【ea aft】er dis\covering pe【ople were not able/ to afford instruments i】n Egypt\.With【【 thi【\s【 idea in mind, \Rabab sign【ed up to a competiti/on run/ by the United Nations Enviro【\nm【e\nt Pr\ogramme.【 Yo/un】g\ Champions of the Earth is h\e\ld annual/ly and supports individuals t\o protect t//he environment. In 】18/\, from over 【750 applicants, he】 was selected alo\ng with \s\ix other finalists b/y a 】global】 jury for their creative, in\】nova【tive \and impactfu/l ideas that of\fer solutions to pressi】ng env】ironmental ch】】alle】ng/es.Rab】ab hopes to create an \awaren】e【ss of/ the impact of plas【tic pol\lution 】on the】 environment whil】e also encouraging /\】people to giv【【\e waste a n【ew lease of li】fe.Click on the video a】bove to learn more 】about this project.Share /this article 【More fr/om lifefzJu

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i90NDepl\eted f/ish stocks can’t w【ait. The EU and\ Norway need to commit to ending over【fishin【g now 【ǀ Viewr39w

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M0hoFor many ages, D】anish fishermen have been u\si】ng cl/】inker-built oaken boats, ligh/\】twei/ght and\ flex/ibl】e enough to land directly on 】sand beaches. Thi【s t\raditi】ona】\l 【/wa】y of coastal fishing is considered【 】】more friendly to the marine environment than large-scale \【industri【al me\thods.【But can the boat-b/uilding craft survive the curren【t decli】ne 【of Danis/h\ fishing vi/llages? Fish/ermen and other activists fro】m the Jammerbugt mun【icip\ality of Denmark are \hopi【ng t\o preserve the tradit【ion for at least \anothe\r 100/ years by b\ui\lding 10 new N\ordic 【sea boats for the \young gener/ation of small-scale coastal fishers. Their asso/ciation【, &ldq/uo;Ocean/【 in Balance”, has laun\ched a public cam【paig】n aiming to raise 7/,150,000\ euro【s for th】e boats.【I【n this 360-degree video, Thomas H【øjr【up, the chairman of/ &ldqu\o;Ocean in Balance”, sh\ows us around \a clink】er-built bo\at curren】tly u】n/der cons【truction, exp】laining \the un\ique way the\se boats are de/signed 】and b/ui【lt.【】Journalist name/ • Denis Loc】tierV【i】deo e】d【\it】【or • De\nis 】】LoctierShare this artic/leShare】TweetSharesendShareTweetSharesendMoreHideSha\reSendSha/reShareShareSendShareSha/reYou\ might al】/so l】ike 】 【 】 \Dan【i/sh fisheries t【ak】】e back 】contro\l 【 】 【 / \ \ 】 How small scal【e fisheries saved Da【nish】 fishi/ng communi【ti【e】s 】 】【 【 \ What’s killing our unde\r】water ecosystems? 【 More abo\ut360° videoFisheryD\e/nmarkEnviron\m\ental protection \ Most 【viewed 】【 】 \ 【 】 】 What 【i//nfluence on climate is the coronav】irus lockdown re】ally having? \ 【 \ / 】 T\he new \AI system safeguarding 】premature babies from】 infection \ / 【【 \Messenger RNA: th【e molecule t\ha】t may 】teach our bodies to b【eat cancer /【】 /【 】 \ \ Apple and Google/ say they【9;ll wo【rk toge】ther to 】trace spread of coron/avirus via smart【phones \ How EU funding i\s c/hanging th\e face/ o【f Latvian\ inn】ov】ation 】 \ Br】owse today�s tag/slKn5

0U充电宝回收2f

3YpaTe【xt sizeAaAaEarl/】ier this\ ye】ar Glasto【nbur】y Fes\tival made hea/dlines b/y annou\ncing t\h\at it wi/ll implement a site-wide ban on plast【ic bottles sta】rt/ing in 2019. All over the world, musi】c festival【s of all【 size/s are becoming \increasi】n/gly c\onscious of their\ ecolog\ic】al footprint.According to P【owerful Thinking, an/ organi【zation that works with festivals t】o l\ower their envir【onment】al footprint, 】i】n the【 United Kingdom alone summer music festivals are resp【onsib】le for ap\proximately 100 kilotons \of CO2 (including audie/nce travel), 23,500 tons of w\aste an】d 5 millio】【n li【ter/s 】of diesel \con【sumpti】o\n.But it/ do】esn’t have to b】e this way\. Mo\re an/d more fe\stivals /are takin【g sustainability and environm【ental co\ns】iderat/ions ve【ry【 se】rio\usly so\/ that you【, the festiva【l-g】oe【r, ca】n party it up the gr\een wa】y. One such【 【f】e【stival is Budapest&rsq】uo;s Sziget Festiva\l, which has won 】Best Li】ne-U/p a】nd /Best Major F\es\tival at 【t\he Europea【n F】estival/ Awards 】sever\al ti\mes. We sat down wit\h】 Akos Do\minus, Sz\iget’s Sustainab】ility Manager for the past 17 ye【ars, to find out what】 】they/&r\squo;r/e doing to【 keep Sziget as green as 】possible. V【iew this post \o/n\ InstagramW\hich re-cup】 d/id/ you ch\oose to take h【ome \wi【th you? :) #sziget #szigetofficial #szigetlove\\revolution #j【ointheloverevolution #\SZIGET2018 #recups】 #/sziget2019 #ec/oA post shared b/y Szi/【get Festival (@sz\igetofficial) on Sep 】1The Eu/rop【ean Union 】h\as stepped i】n to help small /fi【】shing/ communities 】preserve/ their way of】 life, as y\oung people t\urn away from the job that their for】ebears 】d\id/ for generations.T【he Swedish-/speaking i【s】land commu/nity of Pellin/ki in southern Fi\nland is typical of those t/h【e EU 】is trying to hel/】p.For gen\erati】ons, fishing has been a respec/ted trade an】d a traditio/nal way of life for man/y famili/es. But today, t【he number of local fishers is dwindling. Only a few remain\.One r【e\ason is 】dec【l【/\ini【ng catch】es. The fishers blame an in】cr/easing number of 【predators: seals and cormorants \/】damage the c\age\s and dec】imat\e\ f\ish\/ 【stoc】ks.Good c\atches are no longer guaranteed, and t/\he\】 e】conomic surviv【【al of family-r】un fisheries is becoming increasing\ly uncer】tain.M\ost chil\dren from fi【shin\g families make 】a 】safer choice】 to/ leave/ home and study s【ometh【ing else.As their parents age and】 retire, small-sc/ale fisheries, once\ 【typical in Finland, \go ou【t /of busi/ness. Nationwide, the /numbe【【r of professional fishers ha】s decli\【ned in recent decades/ from 10 to aroun】d 400.【Twen】t/y-se\v】en-year-old Marie Kellgren has been fishing full-time fo/r m\or/e than four years, alt【hough she acknowl/edges that there are no】】t man\y like her."We&/rsquo;re \not m\any - young peop\le \fishing】. \I think 】it’s because it’s 【【physically hard wo【rk, and you don&rs【quo;t know for ho】w many years you c/an do \it. It's a bi【g risk to/ start."She in】itiall/y we【nt to stud】y t\ourism \in Helsink【i but then took up the op】por【tuni】ty of【 a local &ldq【uo;Master-【\【Apprentice" pr/og\ram to l【earn /t】he trade f\rom her /fat】her.\The】 EU-supported scheme provided a s\mall g】rant that allowed Marie to work for a year as an a/pprent】ice 】fisherwoman — without 】putting her fathe】r's business under any further fin】anci/a/l st【ra【in.My\ father 】is a fisherman, 【m\y father’s fat】her was 【a f【ish/erman, an【d my】 fathe】r's f【ather's father was\ a fisherman. /】 】 \ V】iking Kel\lgr/en 】 【 】 Her father, Viking, told Euronews: &ldq/uo;/】My fa\th【er is a fishe】rman, my 【father’s father w】as/\ a fi\sherman】, a\nd my father's f】at/h】er's \father was a\ fisherman. So M】arie/【 is the f【ifth gener】ation fishing here/."Th\e t\raining p/rogram included some th/eory an【d/ 】800 h】o】ur\s of fishing pra\ctice\."I lear】ned how to fish with nets and with trap\s, t/【o take care \of t】he fish, the catch, and to/ prepar\e, to 【salt a】nd to smoke and cold【-s】moke a\nd /make fishcake【s, and marke\tin【g, and all \o\ther st【uff about pay\ing 【b】\ills."The funding 【for the "Master-Ap【】p\rentice" pr\ogram wa【s pr\ovided main/ly by the Euro】pean Mar【itim【/e and Fishe】ri】es Fund, which supports generational rene/wal/】 in Europe's】 f/ishing sector. The idea came from \the local fishing comm\unity i\n Pellinki, when another aspir\ing fisherwoman, Tanja Åkerfelt, was struggling to enter the profess/ion."My fat/her didn&r【squo;t think th【at \was a 【go//od ide】a,” Tanja said. &ldq【uo;That&\rsquo;s when I had to 】talk to】 other fisher【m【en, won\de【r】in/g, how coul/d【 we do【 this.”O】ne /of the fishermen she【 sp/oke to was E】sko\ 】Taanila, who man】ages th/e pa/\rtnership /b【etw\een/ privat\e and public sto【ckhold】ers in】 the loc【al fisheries【【 se】ctor, kn【own as a FLAG &mdash】; Fis【heries Local Actio/n Group.Taanila came up with s/implified 】paperwork &mdash\; a formal【 contract and t/he 【tr\aining pr\og】ram\ for both the mas\t\er a/nd t【he\ appr\entice.Training a【 new 】fis【her costs around 6,000 e/ur/os. Esko says it's an ine【xpensive way to sustain【 professional fishing, which is the o】nly ye\ar-round econom】ic 【activity i/n the Pellinki are【a.T\h【e progr/am is helping to slo【\w the decli\ne of south\ern F/inland's fishing community — but/ it cannot reverse it.T【aanil\a 【said: &ldqu】o;Ever】y time 10 fis\hermen q【\uit, we get one or mos】tly two young peopl/e w\ho 】/are inte【re【sted in continuing."The progr【am has been running f【\or three years. Out of 15 app\rentices, 12 d【/ecided to \keep fishing professionally.That's a hi【gh succ【ess rat\e, but with the g/r】owing seal p】roblem and the fu】ture【 of fis/h s/to\cks uncer/tain,】 these/】 ef/for\ts might not be enough."We 】hav\e to get \new fisherme\n because/ the avera/ge age here is 60 years o/ld,&rdquo\; said Ta/an】il\a. &【ldquo;So if\ \we do nothing, 】it】 wi【ll】 //take only【 five or six years and everybody wil【l have quit. It is ve\ry important that\ we have a【 living fishery in【 ou/r coastal areas.】 Without tha/t,/ it c【ou\ld be a dead ar】ea. And that&\/rsquo;s not n【ic/e."Much furthe【r south, off the coast of the Belgian port of Ostend, the fishing 【tradition is thriving and u\【ndergoi/\ng/ a renewal.With its limite【】d coas\tline【 an/d only six d\oze【n\ fishing vessels, Belgium is\n't a big fi【\shing】 country /—】 but in coastal 【West Flanders/ province, f【ishing tradi】t/ionally played an importan【t role.A lo/cal maritime \scho\ol &ndash【; the Maritie【m\ Instituut Mercator – runs\】 a ded/icated training ship, \wh【ich was renovated with EU he\lp.Built\ in 1967/, the "Br【o\odwinner", /a beam tra/wler, was refi/tted to provide bett】er safety and a gr/eater level of comfort than on t\raditional】 ve\】ssels.Bart DeWae/gen\ar/e, \a teacher at/ t【he Maritiem】 Insti/tuut Mercat\or, said s】tudents get\ esse\ntia/l hands-【【on training. Most of th/em d\on't have the se【a in their blood."I 【think maybe 20 per】 ce\nt are from】 familie/s that did it bef】ore, and 80【 per cent don’t【 even know anything about it. The】\y come/ from big /cities lik【e Antwe/rp and 【B\russels, no\th】】i【ng to do\ with t【he s\ea.&rdq】uo;Stud【ent/s go on eight-hour f/ishing trip】s sta【rting \fro【m the age of 12. By\ 16, 】t】hey spend】 hal】f 】o】f th/eir school ti】m】e at sea.Along with var/ious f/ishing-related skills, they learn navigati/on and marine engineerin【g.Most are /seeking a job in the maritime\ sector,】 but not necessarily in the fis/hing industry, 】where the work is har/d and the/ risk of accidents high./Sami \Tebbouche\, a student, said: "Y】ou 】have to learn to sail the vessel on your own】. You have to wa【ke up at night to repair \t\he net/s. It's tough!"Another student, Seppe DeKinde】r, said the unpredictable n】ature of th】e job】 puts many young 【people off. Fishermen's salaries can be ver/【y high - or low, depe】nding on the catch."It&r【squo;s unp\redictable ho【w much】 you ca【/n earn\ sometimes. That&/rsqu\o;s why a lot 【of p】eople are uncerta【in i\f\ they rea/lly/ want to do it/】. And /also becau【se it’s really h】ard wo】rk. And a【 lot 【of p【eople \have k】i/d\s a/nd stuff, and they don&rsq/】uo;t want to【 leave them behind."\In the 1980s, five vo/cati\o\nal】 sch【ools【 】tr\ained 3【00 pupils a /year to wo】rk in fisheries. Today, only o\ne【 【sch】ool wit【h 40 students 【remains.Teache/rs say /that in the modern era, even high salar】ies and improved【 【/working conditions are n】ot enough to /ma【ke fishing attractive for【 yo【ung peopl】e.The scho【\o/l’s headmaster Jac【ki/e Scherrens said: "I\n th】e /p【ast, when they/ 】were, for example, two weeks at se】a, three days in the 】harbour, but from the th【ree da【/ys yo】u had 】to work】 two \days, and that was no problem. Now, when they a/【re, let&rsquo\;s say, /e/ight day】/s a】t sea, 【four days in /h】arbour, and/ you ha】ve to work one【 or two \days/ &m/d】【ash; they don\&\】rsquo;t wan【t that anymore! S/o it&rsquo\;s【 very difficult【 to attract you\n【g people for it."There /\are hopes th【at/\ si】x new vessels about to】 enter the Be/lgian fis】hing【 fleet will revive interest i\n the profession.1212121【】2121212121Shar\e this a【rticleCopy/pas\te the a/rticle video embed link below:CopyShareTw/eetS】【】】har】esendShareTweetShar】esendMoreHide【ShareSendShareShareShareSendSha】reSha\reYou/ might also l/ike 】 【 /\ The importance of re【sto】ring ma/rine【 b/iodiv】ersi】ty \ 【 M\o/re a【boutFishery/YouthOceanEnvironmental【 protection/ 】Most viewed /\ 【 \ / 【 What i【nfluence on climate is 】the coronavirus lockd\own rea\lly having? 】\/ 】 The new AI system safeguar\ding premature babies from infecti【on \ \ 】 / 】 Mes【sen\ger RNA: the molec\】ule that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 【 / 【 【 Apple and Google say t/hey'/;l\l work together /to t】ra/ce spread of //【c\or\onavirus via s】martphones How EU fundin\g is/ cha/nging \the face of Latvian innovation 】 【 【Brows】e today's【 tags,/ 2018 at 5】:35\am PDTWh【e\n did Szi【get really【 start focusing on s】ustainability? What cam【e first &n】d//ash; the demand for/ sustaina【bility fr/om the visitors or /your own s】ense/ of //responsibilit】y?"The latter and it started a v】ery lo\ng time ago. M\an/agement m\ade t\he\ decision to make gre【at】er efforts in terms of sustainability in 2002】 an【d I jo\ined in 2003 to start \working on it. Back then sustainability【 at f/estival【s was mostly co】nfined /t\o was\te manag\ement but【 over the/ years we began to develop a wi\der ran】ge of activit\ies in various spher\es【 of the f】estival."What ste/ps hav\e \you taken in the 【pa【st few yea\rs to/ become more green and what【 can we】 \/expect this y【ear?"I thi【nk that the big/\ge\st neg/ative effect of the festival is waste so ou\r prio\ri/ty is re】ducing and recycling waste, thi】s is ou\【r flagship en\vironmental project. Through the years, we focused mostly on r/ecy/cling【 but s】ince la【st yea\r m】ade huge step t\owards actu/ally re【ducing was】te. We don’t allow pla/stic bags 【【to be sold a【【t the fest/ival/ an/d\ th\e food vendors cannot give out plas\ti\c】 plat】es or /cutlery (i【\t must be made of biodegradable material). Last /yea】r we launched a /new c/ampaign to r\educe the number 】【/of /straws and\ managed to cut use by 50%."S\ziget\】 Festival's "Don'【t Suc\k!】"【 camp【aignKris】】z/ta Csányi"\We also try to pro\tect the gro/un【d and soil by c/over【ing 1】【0,000sq. meters with special covers and then recultivate it. Last /year, f/o【r example,/ we recu】ltivat/ed about 3 a】cres.【 We are also\ constantly experimenting with and】 implementing wa】ter saving】 【【te【chniques such as vacuu/m 【to【ile/t】s/ whi/ch can sa】ve 85% of 【w】ater use \(i/.e. 1.5 liters of water p\er flush instead 】of】 10 liters).""We are a\lways thinking of mo【r/e n【ew campaigns to【 save water./ Last year we employed /a/\ “gu\err\il\la” awarene】ss campaign and found that through some easy】 communicat【【ions \measures we \can enc/ourag】】e\ visitors who are c】amping to shower mor\e eff【iciently. 】/We a【lso \】had /workshops with Cli/mate-KIC alumni】 /in t/he previo】us years and al\w/ays have the\se trash【 fas\h\ion workshops where peo/ple can m】a【k】e festi【va\l accessories \【out o/f waste. T/his year, we have even more sustainability ini\tiatives in \store, whic】h\ w】e will announce on Eart/h /Day (April 22/nd)!"Trash Fas【hion wor【kshop at Sziget FestivalSziget Festival"Those who like t/\o camp at festivals ca【n】 //opt【 for resting their wary bo【dies at the EcoCamp, a special【ized camp\site on the festival g】round】s that uses solar 【】p】ower \and\ boa/st】s】 a slow /food bar that encour【ag【es peop】le/ to live a slow a/n/d sustainable life."Eco C/】】a】mping at Sziget Fest/】ival\】Sz】iget FestivalSolar pow/er at Sziget's Eco\ Cam】pin\g groundSz/iget Festival"Be】/cause /tran\sport\ is 】resp\onsible for a【 very significant part of /a fes【tival’s carbon footprin\】t, we&rs\quo;v/e undertaken a lot of different tactics to re\duce the n】egative/ effects: we offer\ bu\ses/ and boats /to the fe\stival\, provide bike facilities and actively dis】c/ourage visitors thr】ough variou】s c【ampaigns from dri】vi\ng their】 cars here.】""Another in/itiative that /we've had over the pa/st few years w/as 】encouraging pe】ople to \donate their tents to【 charity because it&r】s\quo;s actu/ally a huge issue on a European level. Tons o\f tents a/nd oth/e\r camping】 gear are left behind at festivals so this way we \t\ry to collect them and give away\ to char/ities, like t\he H】ung/ar\ia】n Charity Servi/ce of t/h\e Order of Malta."Tent donation pointSz/\ige【【t FestivalAre【 there any other festivals out ther/e that are】 】really leading the way and can be considered ro【le m】o/dels】 】in \the sphere of s\ustainable party\ing?"There】\ is a /clear/ tendency of【 introduc\i\ng green efforts at \most festivals: we&rs\qu【o;\r【e see】ing a kind of “green&r】dquo; 【】】compe\tition because /th\e y【ounger generat/ions is putt\ing huge press【ures on the festival industry to /be m【o【re sustainable. Glastonbury bann\ed plas\tic bottle/s and】 】we'd like to fo/llow 】【suit in the fut】u/re\."Workshop at Szi】get Festival's "R【\e】cycling C【e/nter"Sz【iget Festival"Many festi\vals are exp\erim\ent\ing with energy effici】ency projects but,【 unf\ortunately, 】so far there\ ha【【s been【 no 【b\reakthro/ugh because festivals 【simpl】y need A【 LOT【 /of】 energy. Last year we used s【ola【r energy t\o power our illuminated banners【 but, of 】【cou\rse\, that’s a\ miniscule percenta】ge of\ the energy a fes/tival requires. On a】 larger scale, solar is 【sim】ply not\ viabl/e at the moment because turnover is 10-20 years, whils/t a festival only lasts several day\s to\ a we】】ek, \in /th【e 】ca】se of【【 Sziget. So, as an industry, we&rsq\uo;re very fa\r /away fr/om being able to use 【s/ol】ar to fully power a f【estiva】l【’s/ needs\."What role, in your opinion, do festival organiz】ers /have in shaping a genera【l 】“gr/een consciousness” /【among their att】ende】\es?"Huge. We all agree 【on that. Festiva】ls have \】a huge impact\ on yo】u/th. When people come to/\ a fest【ival they open their minds t\o le【arning and experienci/ng new thi\ngs. So there’s a【 con//sensus th/a\】t we d【o have a hu【ge 】responsibility/ to in/crease \environmental aw/are【ness."Waste Po\int at Sziget Fest【ivalKriszta /Csány/iWhat tips/advice/ would you giv【e【 attendees to enjoy themselves in a more sustainable way at Sz/iget 2019?"Sm\o】kers &nd【as【h; don’t throw【 】cigarette butts away o\n the ground, always look for a mo\bie ashtray. Find y\o【ur m【o\st environmentally friendly way to co【me to the fe】stival 【(【boat, t【rain, bus or even cyc】le) and use our rec【yc/li\ng/ 【bins."Share this a】rticl【e More from lifeGeDO

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gqkVText sizeA/aAaWh/en it comes/ to cr\ime re】porting, th【e med\i【a\&rsq/u\o;s /coverage is de【cid】edly 【human-fo】cus【ed. We tend to\ see re/p【orting on illega】【l drugs an【d weapons,\ but rarely 【on the expl\oit\ation of our 】natural resources, despit\e the fa/ct t\hat it \happen/s all over the globe a\n【d is a cri/mi】nal of/fe【】nce.【 The 【pro\blem is, environmenta\l crimes/ a】r】e hard to track and hard t【o prove.Arthur Par&eac\ute; is an envir\onmental crime/ rese/archer wh\o has ma】de it his life&rsquo【;s\ aim to co/me up with solut\ions【 to ensure pe】/rpet\rators /are】【 held accountable. Having/ grown up in Cost】a Rica, he spe】nt his c【hi/ldhood immerse【d in 】n\atur\e, and afte/r a fi】rst 【career in t\echnology and in【vestigating /money【 la】\undering/, /he de【cided\ to focus on what/ he knew best &ndash【/; preven/tin】g the d【estruction of o【\ur natural world.“I 】li【ved on the b【e/ach,/ g】oing surfing a【nd hiking /ev\er\y day,&/rdquo; he says. “Mov\ing to the urban streets of 【Paris \was a shock.&rdquo【\;Alongside a team o\f environment【al \lawyers at G&】】ea/cute;os/mi【ne/ in Pa【ris,【 Par&eacu\te; works to【 ex\pos\e c/rimes such as illegal w】ildlife// t【rade, res/ource extraction and pollution. H/is technical adv\【【isors c【onduct criminal analysis and investigations us\ing economic, huma\n and cyber int】el【ligence.【 The data they share can\ then be【 u】s】ed】 in ecological s【tudies or by the 【media to increa\se public \awar【en【e\/ss.The 】map gi\vin\g a\ 【vo/i】ce to the v/oi【】ce/le/ssParé’s latest feat is a tool called the Eco Crim/e Map, which【 allo【ws 】【an【o】】nymous】 users to \/repo/rt environmental crimes from wh/er】ever th/ey are in the worl】d. I/n many /countri】e\s, fear/ of politi\cal ret】aliation【 prevents victims and witnesses from 】repor【ting c【rimes to the\ author】ities. Hence, a map w/hich tracks eco crime in 【【real ti\me cou\ld 】change the way c】orru/ption is dealt with, by dr\awi\ng 【【a【ttenti【】on to c【rimin【/al trade routes. So f\ar - 178 crimes have been sha/red.&ldqu】【o;The g】oal is 】to】 ce\ntralise data related to envir】o/nmental cr】imes,【 o【btai】n information to comp】\are op\erating modes/ with other illicit indu】/stries 】and finally, to give a secure voice/ to the【 vi】ctims and witness\es of these c【rimes wit】hout ri】sk of reprisal】s,” /Par&eac】ute;】 tells Eu】ronews Living, pointing to t\】he map bel】ow..embed-container {position: re【lative; padding-bottom: 80%; height: 0; max-】【wid/th: 100%;} .embed-container iframe, .embed-c\ontainer object, .embed-c/ontainer iframe{posi/【【】tion: a【b【s/olute【; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100/%; he】ight:】 100%;} small{posit/ion: 】ab/solute; z-index: 40; bottom: /0; margin-bottom: -/15px;}Agrandir la carteRed is 】poac】h】in/\gOrange is pollu/tionGreen is illegal ext【raction\B/\lue is an/imal\ traffick/ingYello/w is】 s】anitaryPurpl【e is illegal loggin】gIf \an on】line i/nventory exists 【at t/he】 click /of a butt【on, Par&e\acute; hopes journal/ists, NGOs an】】【d authorities can make \use of the data and ex】pose the frigh/t【ening volume of crime/s committed.Fundamentally, it is a】 t\ool designed to allow any【one 【to sha【re, testify o【r rela/】y infor\mation that affects a territor/y, pop/ulation or animal and\ plant 】species】. \T/he information is 100% enc\rypted for s【a】fety reasons.Is being able to \rep【ort th【e【 crimes/ 】en\ough?Dr. Em\anuel【a Orlando, 【lecturer in Environmen】tal 】Law at the Univers】ity o\f Su\ssex, calls the map an “interesting initiative” saying it will potentially b【e able to address one of the】 main\ pro】blems wi【th e】co crime. “M【ost of these illegal co】nducts causi【ng h\arm【 to the/ environment are often 】【not detected by police and other l【aw en\forcemen\t agenci】es.” She adds, “indeed/, th/e/s】\e i\llegal ac【/tivi/ties te/nd to affect the most vulnerable sectors of the /society,\ su【ch as 】women or \/mino/rity communities in the poorest reg/ions.】”For /Dr. O/rl】ando, w\hile providing the】 voic\【eless with the protect】i】on of【 anonymity is \“welcome and shoul\【d/ be widely /publicised," she emphasises that】 reporting is 】only the first s/t/e\p of ma】n】y.\ &ld/quo;Environmental cri】me【s【 ar】e a qui】te complex issue, particu\l【arly when this is linked to org】anised crime.”S【he conclu\des/, &ldquo//;for】 these typ/es o/【f crimes, an effective strategy needs to rely on a strong enf\orcement /sy】stem” and in】stituti】ona/l framewo】rk to pr【operly ad\dress the corrup【tion.How many/ billi】\on\s is】 the environmenta/l crime industry wor【th?Acco/rd【ing to Europo/l/, the Eur\opean Union&rsquo/;s law enforcement agency, the 【/annual 【va/lue of tran\snati【onal\ environm/ental crime】 is】 esti【mate/d t\o be worth &\e\ur\o;63 to 192 billi】on euros annu】a】lly. In fa\ct, /en【vironmenta/l crime can/ be as pro】fitable【 as i】llegal dru【g trafficking, but the sanction】s】/ are m/】uch lower, an/d it i\s hard/\er to de】tect. These fa【ctors make it highl】】y a/ttractive for or/ganised crime groups.G&】eac】u【te;osmine calls it “/t/he most l/uc【rat\ive but least repr】essed illicit】 industry i\n the world.&rdq【uo; 【Group】【s are 【known to orchest\rate fake c】ons\【e\【rvation programmes, 】for examp\le, that waste m】illions of dollars in the process.“D/on’t b】uy pets online,” Par&eacut【e;/ /wa\】rns. “Often dogs and cats are being tra】ffic】\k】ed】 il\legally】 】and/ have been【 used for animal \testing.” Th/ere is/ /e/ven a \new industry emerg/in】g called cyber poac】hing. “This is a new me\thod of smuggl/ing which/ takes place on social medi\a and marketplaces like /Ebay or Amazon, \where iv/ory a【nd rhi/no ho/rns are being sold.”\The reason thes【e crimes a/re】 too o【ften ignored comes 】down /to fear of/ “blackmail a【nd pressure.”Phot\os took on a/ mission fo】r tigers parts traffic/king in Europe. The fangs here\/ were sold /K eachArth】u/r ParéIs environme\ntal crime \the s/ame as eco/cide?All over the world, laws are in p/lace to prevent envi\ronmental c\rimes from posing thre\】ats /to our everyday lives. From the dum//pi\ng of /\hazardous waste, to overfishi【ng/ a protec/ted speci/es or ivory\ \traf/ficking.By co\ntrast, ecocid【e is all/ ab【out /creating a legal dut/y of\ care for life \on ear】th【. It is the \ca\ll for the envir\onmen】t to be given rights, much li【ke humans, and/ was borne out【 of the disregard for rising 】sea levels and global war\ming】 ar【ound the world.Th\e St】op Ecocide 】campaign w【as \steered by barrister】 Polly Higgins, who died in Apri【l 】201【【9, and has /since been/ led by environmental a【ctivist 】Jojo Meht】a and others.If legally\ implemente/d, ecocide would】 mean that any hu】man activi/ty causing extens/ive d/amage t\o ecosystem【s 【or harmin【g th】e wellbeing of a species would become a crim【inal offense. This would mak】e chi【ef 】executives【 and government ministers, who commission\ /the destruction of the natural /wor\ld, criminal/ly liable】.Thus far, it has not yet been accepted as an int【erna】tiona】l crime\ by 】the United Nations.Unlike the il】l】egal \trade in drugs and other illicit goods, &ld】quo;natural resources are finite a】nd\ cannot 【b】e replenished in a l\ab,” 】stat【es Int\erpol【. 】“As such, there is a sense o\f】 urgency to comb\at en\vironmental c】rime.”The \Eco Crime Map is curr\ently crowdfunded and in search of sponsors to \sta【y afloat. Curre】ntly, it is av】ailable in English, Spanish and French/ an/d can be separated into six categ/ories】: po\aching, illegal extr【a\ctio/n,】 sa【nitary, pollut\ion, animal trafficking and illegal logging.Share this articl/e 【 More from lifeo5aE

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d7VGYou and I 】/mig【ht not【 see a goldmine/ i\n the sewag/e water【 from the city of Brussels, but a tea\m of scienti【sts are hunting for gold and silver here."Al/l the sewage of the city arr】i】ves here and /in th【e/ treatmen/t \process, the】/y 【clean up the water whi【ch i/s disposed to the river b\ack. And all t】he so\lid mater\ia【l which con\tai/ns also a/【ll the/\ metals】 is c\once/ntrated 【in t】\【he slud】ge," explain\s \Dr N\atacha Brion -】 】VUB Scie【ntist.D\r Natacha Brion is c】ollecting sa】mpl\es at a number of sewage s【ites around Brussels/.T】hey're 6 mo】nths into a】 /3 year project. Hunti/ng for tiny nano-par/ticles of gold and silver not visib】le to the naked eye - at /ea/ch stage】 wh/ile/ the sewag\e is processed.Their init【ial findings are that the dried out dark \brown dust cal\led slidge i\s the richest.Th\e material f\alls into the co\n】taine/r, th/is is th【e sludge, th/e mat\erial /that N【atacha and her team ar【e /interested in. It/\ smells\ disgusting.Back in t\he lab w【here three uni】v】ersitie\s ar\e c】ollabo】ra】ting on this pro【ject - they】're working out how to extract 】t\he preci【】ous metal/s."We w】/oul【d like to use nano-materials/ and i【ron oxide【/ nano-particle【s which are magnetic t【o be able to collect se\parately \these 【different ions in 】solutions,"】 Professor Gill】es Bruylan【ts - UL/【/B Scientist.Their initial tests find th\ere's 】aroun/d 1 gram of gold and 5 grams o/f sil/v\er per to/n of\ sludge.They bel/ieve sports\ 】clot【hing or perhaps jewellery during washing and ce】rtain/ medicines are w\here the\ nanop/ar/ticles of gold and silver are】/ coming fro/m."Their】 resour\ce \i/s almost【/ exhau【sted so yo/u【/ don't fi//nd them easily anymore in nature. And/ so now many scientists are t\rying to find al/l poss\ible 【ways o\f recyc\ling these,/" says B【rio【n.And the whole thing i\s also【 about opti/mising sewage proces】sing so treate】d wate/r enter【in【g rivers】 like【 thi\s remains uncontaminated.Shar\e this articleCopy/pa\ste the article video emb【ed link below:Cop【yShar】eTweetSharesendShar/eTwe\etSharesen\dMo【reHi/deShare/SendShareShareShareSendShareShareYou mig【ht also like / / 【 【 】Meet the researcher【s us\in\g se【a tu【rtles 】to learn more about cyclones / 】 \ \ 【 \ European p\【roject Best【Med/Grape i/s /helping winegrow\ers 【transform g/rap】e】 w\aste into cos/metic products 】 / Degraded land begi【ns to bloom thank\s to European compo】【sting project \ \ More a/bo\utResearch】 & DevelopmentResearch\Enviro】nmenta【l prote\ction 【 \Br/owse【 【tod/ay�】39【;s tagsjqfl

zI回收塑料颗粒DD

oEsEIn a tighten/【ed u】p policing of\ the】ir /fishin】g 】industry Thailand has beg】un intercepti\ng and ins【pecting fishing boats far o\ut at sea this ye】a】r, one of many\ n/e/w measures\/ to curb】 its dangerously high levels of overfishing【.【For d【ecades the Gulf of Thailand's fish stocks were p\lundered with abandon. Limits were ignored and b【oa\ts re【gul\arly worked in restri\cted areas, endangering【// speci/es with bar/ely 【any o/ve】rsight.Those fish\ went/ on to be exported, often ending up on the plates of cons【umers in Europe】.But \internati\onal pressure moun【t\ed in the \last few years, and since \the EU is the largest importer /of Thailand's fi【sh it managed to wield a lot of influe/nce.I【n 2015/ th\】e EU issued a &ldq【uo;yello【\w card,” wa\rning the /Thai government】 it would suspend its imp】orts 】if no/ a【ction was】 t】【ake【n, and in Janu】ary it was finally lifted \and a "green ca【rd" was awarded.The measu/res /Thailand has now adopted to\ satisfy th/e EU【 ra/nge from \new rules t\o vessel// monitoring systems, as well as a satellite-\based system\ of track/【in\】g the mo】v【ements \of fishing boats, enforced by the Royal Thai Navy.T【【hai officials say 】Europe&rsquo/;【s 【pr\es】sure has helpe】【d the/m to implem\【ent 】these reform】s, convincing the 【fisheri\es to accept t【ighte【ned control.&l\dquo【\;】As the biggest importer of】\【 the s\eaf【ood of t【he world, I thi【nk the EU is using 【its power trying to solve the probl】em. That&rsqu/o【;s \w【hy /we’re not c【om【pla/ining about the yello】【w card at【 al/l. And the yello\w card for /us is】 like 】a w】ake-up【 c】all: 】O\K, you know the pro【blem, no【w/ you ha/ve to 】wake 【up an】d do something】 s/ignificant,&rdq【uo; Adisorn P\romthep, the Director&nd/ash;Genera\l /of Thailand's Department o/f【 】Fisheries, told E】uron\ews.&】l/dquo;Sinc【e the yellow card was\ issued, the 【Commission and Thailand have\ eng【aged\ in a construc\tive process of c【ooperation and dialogue,&rdq\uo; the Europ\e【an Commission, 】the /executiv【e\ arm o】f th【e EU,】\ s【aid【 in \a statem\/ent in February announcing t\】h】e lifting of the card】.&【ldquo;Th/is has resul\ted in a major upgrade of t】【he Thai fis【heries g【ov/ernance, 】】in a/ccordan\ce w\i】th the internatio【nal commi】t/ments o\f the country.】”Thai seafood exports stoo/d at 1.85 bi【lli/on e【uros in 2017, Co/mmerce Min】istry】/ dat】a show, recovering to their 2014 l】evel/ after a drop i\n 2015 to 】.6 billion 【euros following the European Union\ w】arning.Ab/out 9.】9 perce】nt of Thai s/e】afood exports/ 【wen】t t\o the European Union last year, v】ersu\s 10.3 【percent i】n 2014, m】inistry d】ata sho【w.Jaroo\nsak Petchsri, Head of【 Thai R\egional Fisheri】es Patro】l, \has 【been /patr\olling the se/\as off Thailand for 30 】ye】ars sa//id 】he's noticed the difference."In the past, w/e didn&rsqu/【o;t really have much control\ over the f/isheries&h【ellip; They were depleting the sea,】 harvest/in【g fi\sh big and sma】ll, remo/ving it in spawni/【ng season】s. Now, with \the new la\ws,【 t【hese 【things h\ave ch/anged," he told Euronews.Even some of the fishing \captains】【 say/ - outwardly at leas【t - th/at they're fi/ne with the new 】s/【yst/e【m.】“I agree th【at all t//he i\llegal fishi【ng h【as to /end. We no】w hav【e a 】satellite tracker on our// bo\a\t, there are inspections 【at port】s, we l\og everything we】 do/ every d/ay, 】so it woul【d\ be really\ hard to d】o/ any illeg【al fishing n【ow,” Prasi\】tchai Woraratyanont, a fishing boat captain, told Eu\ronew/s.S【】amut\ Sakhon 【port, 40 ki/lome】t【res southwest of Bangkok, is one of 】Thailand’s largest.All large boats using it no【w hav\e to 】\re】po/rt to the authorit/ies before and after ever】y fishing trip. Officers use a new c【omput】er system analysing detailed information】 about each vessel and its journey at sea.【 If anything seems/ su/sp\ic【ious/, the system will automat【ically recom\me】nd a thor/ough inspection【.【“We consider \it v\ery important to educat】e t/he fisher/men a/nd explain to them what 【regulations they must fol\low. These insp【ections all/ow us【 t/o make su】r\e everything 【is in 【order as far as the vessel, the】 c/rew /and the\ catch \ar】e concerne\d," Sagultem Peera, head of the port'【s In/ Out Centre told Eu【ronews.And bac/k/ at the 【Department of Fisheries' brand new monitoring c\entre in B\angkok roughl//y 600Text /s【izeAaAaF【\r/om climat\e change to deforestation,pollution/to t\heloss\ of biodiversit\y, the biggest threats 【to the environment come with a growing awareness and a new willingness to embrace 】moreeco-friendly solutions. 【We】 collected five inspiring examples from around the world.One of th\e\ 】】things that got scie】ntis【ts worried is that/ swarms /of summer bugs seem to be a thing\ of 【】the past. In /the US【, ma/ny states are trying to /stop thei】r /decline. Maryl】】and\ came u/p wit【/】】h an id\ea whic【h already \proved itself, howev】e【r, for\ s【o\me\,\ it might seem to /be contr\o\versial.Another good \examp【le is the tin【y Greek island of T/il【os, which i/s soon to go completely off-grid as i/t benefits 【from the joint \initiative of t/he U/ni【ve/rsity /of\ Ea/st Anglia and the Unive/rsity o/f Applied \Sciences in Pira【eus. T【ilos\ i/s known as 】a green isl/and, pop\ular】 with hik【ers and 【bir【dwatchers, an【d most of the island \is now a protect】ed nature reserve.London is 【an es】peci\ally inspir/ing place fo\r those 【appl【ying eco-fr【ien\】dly solutio\ns, such as this】 classy【 hotel in th【//e heart 【of London, which has created a /natural 】【habitat/【 for wildlife,】】 or this s/tart-up coming up w【ith what's claimed to be 】the wor\l【d's first intelligent【 biological ai】r filter.2018 has\ seen【 some great ad【van【ces in green technology, click 【on \t】he v】i/d/】eo t/o learn mo】re about our selec\ti【on.Share this a\rticle More f\ro】m p【laces fish\ing /vessels, all e/quipp【ed /with s\atellit】/e trackers, a\/re wat】ched aro\und the c【】lock.&l\【d/\quo;We a】re receiving data on the speed 【/and direction of each boat in r/eal t\ime. If a trawler ha【s sl\owed down, \】fishing in a restricted【 \zone, we&【rsquo;ll start /the procedure to intercept/,” Bundit K】ullavanijaya, Head /of Ve】ssel M【onitor【ing System /workgroup, Thailand Department of/ Fishe【rie\s, said.Containers with frozen fish are als/o inspected with x-r\ays and secured wit】h new ele】ctronic l【\ocks. 】/Be\fore, illegal/ catch】es from other count\ries could be shipped through Thailand to Europe.Thailand is jus】t one of many cou【ntries struggling with harmful fishing practices. An estima/ted one-fifth of all worldw【ide catches ar】e illegal, unreported, or /unr】eg/ulated — g【lobally that】’s 10 billion euros pe\r year./Som/e illegal catches w\ould often l\and in Thailand o\/n refrigerated cargo ships. So/me 【/o【f these huge vessels【 were【 getting t/hei\r/ d\aily catch from smaller,】 il/leg】al fishing/ boats on th/e high s【eas — a practice/ calle/d &ld/qu【o;fish laund】ering.&\rdquo;Now/ f】/oreign flag vess【e/ls are not al【l】owed i【nto T//h【ai ports any【more unless 【their cargo is/ 】properly c【【er/t\ifi【ed.“No/w 【that our laws hav\e been amend【ed, we ca【n cont/rol and inspect f/orei】gn flag v/e/ssels. The】\ sys\te\m is very comp【lete - we can 【trace every can of tuna b\ack/ to the v/e【ssel tha【t caught it,"\ Jama【ree Rakbanglea\m, the Port State Measures Inspec】tor, told Euronews.121212121212121212Share this articl/eCopy/paste the 【article\ video embed link below/:Cop【】yShareT【weetShar】esendShareTweetSharesendMoreHid\eShareSendShareShareShareSend】ShareShare【You mig【h【\t also like / 【 Why \did it tak/e /3.5 years f/or T【hail【【and to get【 rid of t【h/e EU’s \illegal fishing 】�【39;/yellow /card'? 【 / / More about\F【ishe/ryThailandOceanEnvir】o/n\mental prote/c】tion / / \ Most viewed 】 】 【 \ What influe/nc/e o【n c【limat\e is【 the【 coronavirus lockdown really having? 】 / 【 \ T/he new AI syst【em safeguard【ing】 p【remature bab/ies from infection / \ Messenge\r RNA: the molecule\ that may 】teach/ our】 b【o】dies to beat cancer 】 【 \ /【 / Apple and Google say they\'ll work together】 to /t】race \spr/ead of co\/ronavirus vi【a sm\artphones 】【 】 \ Ho【w EU fu\nding is cha/nging the】 】face o【f Lat【\via】n innovation 】 【 】 Browse toda/y's tagsgc77

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